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July 19, 2009
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explanation of construction by whisperpntr explanation of construction by whisperpntr
After seeing :iconwhitewolf16:'s request for redlines I believe there is quite a bit of confusion on how to use the how tos I made. So here is hopefully a better clarification. Original image can be seen here [link]

First, the skeleton is just step one of constructing anatomy. This and the line of action are very important to creating a pose, but they are not the only step.

Two, perhaps I didn't point this out clearly but creating the basic anatomy and building blocks are very important. Getting it 100% right? Well it's not AS important if you will use references to learn and fix the construction, but they need to be in there.

Another reason why construction is important is when you life/video/photo draw. The chest and the other areas are not simply circles like shown in the skeleton. (that is the rib cage by the way). They are actually organic blocks. While I am not an expert at creating the perfect block, that is all right as long as one is in the ballpark area and pair this basic construction with a midline.

Three, when you are past the block construction stage use references. You will learn the most at this stage and you will inevitably correct or tweak the underlying construction. You won't get national geographic results with this nor any tutorial. But with rinse and repeat you will invent your own blocks which make more sense for you as well as a better knowledge of animals.

Always use indirect references, and if you are simply trying to learn, direct references where you copy the "feel" and motion rather than the picture.

Focus on the anatomy not getting it to look like a photocopy of the picture. Even bad initial attempts where you learn a lot are successes more than failures.

hope this elucidates and clears up any confusion
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:iconanimemeepchan:
ANIMEMEEPCHAN Featured By Owner May 17, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
THANK YOU SO MUCH! This really helped me!
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:iconrg116:
rg116 Featured By Owner Oct 22, 2011  Student Artist
You make very useful tutorials.
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:iconlaehlani:
Laehlani Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2009  Student Digital Artist
Very interesting... C:
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:iconnavina:
Navina Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2009  Student Photographer
I LOVE your tutorials.

The one thing I might ask that you might someday maybe explain a bit better is the line of action. This has always confused me, such as... where to start with it? Or where you place it? How do you build off of it?

Just an idea if you get the chance or time :)
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:iconwhisperpntr:
whisperpntr Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2009
Line of action has never been that clear for me either and I've seen tons of differing definition. Bbut what I use it for is to draw from the most active, weight bearing leg to the head or most dynamic point of the upper body.

This is not a hard rule, especially when you have a rolling animal
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:iconwolfvane14:
Wolfvane14 Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2009
The line of action is used as a guide for the shape and bend of your drawing. I dont really know how to phrase it but these pictures show it:

[link]

[link]

[link]
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:iconwhisperpntr:
whisperpntr Featured By Owner Jul 20, 2009
Yea this is the definition I've seen in books. It also helps with the flow in animation as seen in the 3rd link in your example. For still drawings like ours though the line of action serves a purpose to exaggerate and stretch the drawing into an action packed extreme like number one.

I do not see a strong LoA in number two.
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:iconnavina:
Navina Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2009  Student Photographer
Ah okay. So you just make the line as sort of... something to build off of?
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:iconwhisperpntr:
whisperpntr Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2009
Yes. You first envision your animal and how it should look on paper. Do you want the animal facing away from the viewer or towards.

If you have trouble finding out where your animal should be You can start with a solid 3d rectangle to help you envision where your animal should be placed first.

Then you can start with the line of action. This is where you would draw the animal from a weight supporting or most active hind leg (or weight supporting fore) to head. then you build your skeleton around that line. If you dislike the pose (and this is quite often) you go ahead and rebuild it. When both hind legs are equally weight bearing (think of a launching jump) you can draw the LoA between it's legs to the ground.

In any case drawing a good pose requires SEVERAL redraws but at this early stage redrawing is easy and not difficult to do as it involves only the LoA and the skeleton.
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:iconnavina:
Navina Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2009  Student Photographer
This is awesome.... thank you!!!!
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